Describe Cluster Headache and its epidemiology.

Richard is a 40-year-old man with a history of 4 weeks of cluster headache once each year. These began when he was 35 years old. His cluster periods occur in the fall. The cluster period begins slowly, increasing over 1 week, reaching a peak where Richard has two or three severe cluster attacks each day. They occur from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Each cluster headache lasts from 40 to 90 minutes, and the headaches are severe. The pain is always on the right side, with eye tearing and nasal congestion.

Richard comes into our office 1 week into this fall’s cluster series. The headaches are increasing in intensity, and he is miserable with the pain.

Please complete the following questions:

  • Describe Cluster Headache and its epidemiology.
  • What would be your goals for therapy for Richard? Give rationale with evidence from articles.

apa formart cite references

Consider how federal agendas promote healthcare issues and how these healthcare issues become agenda priorities

Discussion

Regardless of political affiliation, every citizen has a stake in healthcare policy decisions. Hence, it is little wonder why healthcare items become such high-profile components of presidential agendas. It is also little wonder why they become such hotly debated agenda items.

Consider a topic that rises to the presidential level. How did each of the presidents (Trump, Obama, and Bush) handle the problem? What would you do differently?

Post your response to the discussion question: Consider a topic that rises to the presidential level. How did each of the presidents (Trump, Obama, and Bush) handle the problem? What would you do differently?

To Prepare:

  • Review the Resources and reflect on the importance of agenda setting.
  • Consider how federal agendas promote healthcare issues and how these healthcare issues become agenda priorities.

Critical thinking activities

Please answer the 3 questions in pdf format, with more than 300 words and no plagiarism. In advance thank you very much.

This case study documents an ongoing interaction between a wife and her husband who live in a spacious home in a gated community.

When Dan (now 80) and Jane (now 65) began dating more than 15 years ago, both were emotionally charged to begin their lives anew. Well-educated and financially secure, they had a lot in common. Dan was a protestant minister, and Jane’s deceased husband had been a protestant minister. Both had lost their spouses. Jane’s first husband had suffered a catastrophic cerebral aneurysm 2 years earlier. Dan had conducted the funeral service for Jane’s husband. Dan’s wife had died of terminal cancer a little over a year earlier. Dan’s first wife had been a school counselor; Jane was a school teacher. Both had children in college. They shared a love for travel. Dan was retired but continued part-time employment, and Jane planned to continue teaching to qualify for retirement. Both were in great health and had more than adequate health benefits. Within the year they were married. Summer vacations were spent snorkeling in Hawaii, mountain climbing in national parks, and boating with family. After 7 years, Dan experienced major health problems: a quadruple cardiac bypass surgery, followed by surgery for pancreatic cancer. Jane’s plans to continue working were dropped so she could assist Dan to recover and then continue to travel with him and enjoy their remaining time together. Dan did recover—only to begin to exhibit the early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. One of the early signs appeared the previous Christmas as they were hanging outdoor lights. To Jane’s dismay, she noted that Dan could not follow the sequential directions she gave him. As time passed, other signs appeared, such as some memory loss and confusion, frequent repeating of favorite phrases, sudden outbursts of anger, and decreased social involvement. Assessments resulted in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer’s disease. Dan was prescribed Aricept, and Jane began to prepare herself to face this new stage of their married life. She read literature about Alzheimer’s disease avidly and organized their home for physical and psychological safety. A kitchen blackboard displayed phone numbers and the daily schedule. Car keys were appropriately stowed. It was noted that she began to savor her time with Dan. Just sitting together with him on the sofa brought gentle expressions to her face. They continued to attend church services and functions but stopped their regular swims at their exercise facility when Dan left the dressing room naked one day. Within the year, Jane’s retired sister and brother-in-law relocated to a home a short walk from Jane’s. Their intent was to be on call to assist Jane in caring for Dan. Dan and Jane’s children did not live nearby so could only assist occasionally. As Dan’s symptoms intensified, a neighbor friend, Helen, began to relieve Jane for a few hours each week. At this time, Jane is still the primary dependent-care agent. She prides herself in mastering a dual shower; she showers Dan in his shower chair first, and then, while she showers, he sits on the nearby toilet seat drying himself. Her girlfriends suggested that this was material for an entertaining home video! Although Jane is cautious in her care for Dan, she often drives a short distance to her neighborhood tennis court for brief games with friends or spends time tending the lovely gardens she and Dan planted. During these times, she locks the house doors and leaves Dan seated in front of the television with a glass of juice. She watches the time and returns home midway through the hour to check on Dan. On one occasion when she forgot to lock the door while she was gardening, Dan made his way to the street, lost his balance, reclined face-first in the flower bed, and was discovered by a neighbor. Jane has given up evenings out and increased her favorite pastime of reading. Her days are filled with assisting Dan in all of his activities of daily living. And, often, her sleep is interrupted by Dan’s wandering throughout their home. At times, when the phone rings, Dan answers and tells callers Jane is not there. Jane, only in the next room, informs him “Dan, I am Jane.” Friends are saddened by Dan’s decline and concerned with the burdens and limitations Jane has assumed as a result of Dan’s dependency.

Critical thinking activities

1. Examine this case study through the dependency cycle model (Fig. 14.3). The outer arrows show a progression through varying stages of dependency. The inner circle represents who can be involved in the dependency cycle. Where are Jane and Dan in this cycle?

2. Using the basic dependent-care system model (Fig. 14.4), assess Dan and Jane. Identify the basic conditioning factors (BCFs) for each. What is the effect of Dan’s BCFs on his self-care agency? Is he able to meet his therapeutic self-care demands? Continue on to diagnose Dan’s self-care deficit and resulting dependent-care deficit. Now assess Jane’s self-care system.

3. Design a nursing system that addresses Jane’s self-care system as she increases her role as dependent-care agent for Dan.

Thinking Critically about Ethical Issues

Reading # 9 from Ruggiero’s, Thinking Critically about Ethical Issues. At minimum, the below chapter from this book is to be read. With all readings in this course, you are encouraged to read actively and discerningly/critically at all times.

  • Considering Obligation – Ch. 9 (Pages 111-121)

In each case, identify the conflicting obligations and decide whether the action taken is morally right.

1. An executive of a large company learns that the company is violating the state antipollution law by dumping chemicals into the lake bordering its plant. The state inspectors are being bribed to ignore the violation. The executive takes no action.

2. A doctor on duty in a hospital emergency room one Halloween night treats a 15-year-old boy whose eye was injured by an exploding firecracker. He notices the boy is drunk. Because the extent of the injury is not certain, he has the boy admitted to the hospital and notifies his parents. When they arrive, the boy is under sedation, so his drunken condition escapes their detection. Nevertheless, the doctor informs them that their son had been drinking.

Explain why the FDA, not OSHA, was responsible for investigating this case

As a team, consider the following scenario:

On Dec. 7, 2000, the Cincinnati Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) office heard through media and police reports that there were two deaths at a nursing home in Ohio. OSHA determined that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should take a lead role in performing an investigation.

Because the nursing home had many residents who had unhealthy respiratory systems, the nursing home routinely ordered and received tanks that contained pure oxygen. During one delivery, the supplier mistakenly delivered one tank of pure nitrogen in addition to the three tanks of pure oxygen that had been ordered. The nitrogen tank had both an oxygen and nitrogen label. An employee at the nursing home connected the nitrogen tank to the nursing home’s oxygen delivery system. This event caused two nursing home residents to die, and three additional nursing home residents were admitted to hospitals in critical condition. Within the following month, two of these three additional residents also died, bringing the total death toll to four. (Based on accident #837914 www.osha.gov)

Write a 1,050- to 1,400-word paper in which your team compares the Normal Accident Theory to the Culture of Safety model. Include the following in your paper:

  • Explain what factors can play a role in organizational accidents similar to the one highlighted in the scenario. How do organizational processes give rise to potential failures? How can certain conditions influence errors and violations within the workplace (e.g., operating room, pharmacy, intensive care unit)? What are the errors and violations committed by “sharp end” individuals? How does the breaching of defenses or safeguards affect these accidents?
  • Explain why the FDA, not OSHA, was responsible for investigating this case.
  • Explain how the Culture of Safety model could have been applied to reduce risk in this scenario.
  • Explain the five general principles used in the Culture of Safety model.
  • Explain actions that could have been taken to manage risk by applying each of the five general principles used in the Culture of Safety model to this scenario.

Cite at least 3 peer-reviewed, scholarly, or similar references, and your textbook to support your assignment.

Describe Cluster Headache and its epidemiology.

Richard is a 40-year-old man with a history of 4 weeks of cluster headache once each year. These began when he was 35 years old. His cluster periods occur in the fall. The cluster period begins slowly, increasing over 1 week, reaching a peak where Richard has two or three severe cluster attacks each day. They occur from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. Each cluster headache lasts from 40 to 90 minutes, and the headaches are severe. The pain is always on the right side, with eye tearing and nasal congestion.

Richard comes into our office 1 week into this fall’s cluster series. The headaches are increasing in intensity, and he is miserable with the pain.

Please complete the following questions:

  • Describe Cluster Headache and its epidemiology.
  • What would be your goals for therapy for Richard? Give rationale with evidence from articles.

apa formart cite references

political affiliation

Discussion

Regardless of political affiliation, every citizen has a stake in healthcare policy decisions. Hence, it is little wonder why healthcare items become such high-profile components of presidential agendas. It is also little wonder why they become such hotly debated agenda items.

Consider a topic that rises to the presidential level. How did each of the presidents (Trump, Obama, and Bush) handle the problem? What would you do differently?

Post your response to the discussion question: Consider a topic that rises to the presidential level. How did each of the presidents (Trump, Obama, and Bush) handle the problem? What would you do differently?

To Prepare:

  • Review the Resources and reflect on the importance of agenda setting.
  • Consider how federal agendas promote healthcare issues and how these healthcare issues become agenda priorities.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

As a team, consider the following scenario:

On Dec. 7, 2000, the Cincinnati Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) office heard through media and police reports that there were two deaths at a nursing home in Ohio. OSHA determined that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should take a lead role in performing an investigation.

Because the nursing home had many residents who had unhealthy respiratory systems, the nursing home routinely ordered and received tanks that contained pure oxygen. During one delivery, the supplier mistakenly delivered one tank of pure nitrogen in addition to the three tanks of pure oxygen that had been ordered. The nitrogen tank had both an oxygen and nitrogen label. An employee at the nursing home connected the nitrogen tank to the nursing home’s oxygen delivery system. This event caused two nursing home residents to die, and three additional nursing home residents were admitted to hospitals in critical condition. Within the following month, two of these three additional residents also died, bringing the total death toll to four. (Based on accident #837914 www.osha.gov)

Write a 1,050- to 1,400-word paper in which your team compares the Normal Accident Theory to the Culture of Safety model. Include the following in your paper:

  • Explain what factors can play a role in organizational accidents similar to the one highlighted in the scenario. How do organizational processes give rise to potential failures? How can certain conditions influence errors and violations within the workplace (e.g., operating room, pharmacy, intensive care unit)? What are the errors and violations committed by “sharp end” individuals? How does the breaching of defenses or safeguards affect these accidents?
  • Explain why the FDA, not OSHA, was responsible for investigating this case.
  • Explain how the Culture of Safety model could have been applied to reduce risk in this scenario.
  • Explain the five general principles used in the Culture of Safety model.
  • Explain actions that could have been taken to manage risk by applying each of the five general principles used in the Culture of Safety model to this scenario.

Cite at least 3 peer-reviewed, scholarly, or similar references, and your textbook to support your assignment.

How would your communication and interview techniques for building a health history differ with each patient?

Discussion: Building a Health History

Effective communication is vital to constructing an accurate and detailed patient history. A patient’s health or illness is influenced by many factors, including age, gender, ethnicity, and environmental setting. As an advanced practice nurse, you must be aware of these factors and tailor your communication techniques accordingly. Doing so will not only help you establish rapport with your patients, but it will also enable you to more effectively gather the information needed to assess your patients’ health risks.

For this Discussion, you will take on the role of a clinician who is building a health history for a particular new patient assigned by your Instructor.

Photo Credit: Sam Edwards / Caiaimage / Getty Images

To prepare:

With the information presented in Chapter 1 of Ball et al. in mind, consider the following:

  • By Day 1 of this week, you will be assigned a new patient profile by your Instructor for this Discussion. Note: Please see the “Course Announcements” section of the classroom for your new patient profile assignment.
  • How would your communication and interview techniques for building a health history differ with each patient?
  • How might you target your questions for building a health history based on the patient’s social determinants of health?
  • What risk assessment instruments would be appropriate to use with each patient, or what questions would you ask each patient to assess his or her health risks?
  • Identify any potential health-related risks based upon the patient’s age, gender, ethnicity, or environmental setting that should be taken into consideration.
  • Select one of the risk assessment instruments presented in Chapter 1 or Chapter 5 of the Seidel’s Guide to Physical Examination text, or another tool with which you are familiar, related to your selected patient.
  • Develop at least five targeted questions you would ask your selected patient to assess his or her health risks and begin building a health history.
By Day 3 of Week 1

Post a summary of the interview and a description of the communication techniques you would use with your assigned patient. Explain why you would use these techniques. Identify the risk assessment instrument you selected, and justify why it would be applicable to the selected patient. Provide at least five targeted questions you would ask the patient.

Note: For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view and respond to your colleagues’ postings. Begin by clicking on the “Post to Discussion Question” link, and then select “Create Thread” to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click on Submit, you cannot delete or edit your own posts, and you cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully before clicking on Submit!

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Ball, J. W., Dains, J. E., Flynn, J. A., Solomon, B. S., & Stewart, R. W. (2019). Seidel’s guide to physical examination: An interprofessional approach (9th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.
Chapter 1, “The History and Interviewing Process”This chapter explains the process of developing relationships with patients in order to build an effective health history. The authors offer suggestions for adapting the creation of a health history according to age, gender, and disability.

Chapter 5, “Recording Information”This chapter provides rationale and methods for maintaining clear and accurate records. The authors also explore the legal aspects of patient records.

Sullivan, D. D. (2019). Guide to clinical documentation (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis.
Chapter 2, “The Comprehensive History and Physical Exam” (pp. 19–29)

Deckx, L., van den Akker, M., Daniels, L., De Jonge, E. T., Bulens, P., Tjan-Heijnen, V. C. G., … Buntinx, F. (2015). Geriatric screening tools are of limited value to predict decline in functional status and quality of life: Results of a cohort study. BMC Family Practice, 16, 1–12.  https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1186/s12875-015-0241- x 

Wu, R. R., & Orlando, L. A. (2015). Implementation of health risk assessments with family health history: Barriers and benefits. Postgraduate Medical Journal, (1079), 508–513. 

Lushniak, B. D. (2015). Surgeon general’s perspectives: Family health history: Using the past to improve future health. Public Health Reports, (1), 3. 

Jardim, T. V., Sousa, A. L. L., Povoa, T. I. R., Barroso, W. K. S., Chinem, B., Jardim, L., … Jardim, P. C. B. V. (2015). The natural history of cardiovascular risk factors in health professionals: 20-year follow-up. BMC Public Health, 15(1111), 1–7. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1186/s12889-015-2477-8 

Shadow Health Support and Orientation Resources

Use the following resources to guide you through your Shadow Health orientation as well as other support resources:

Frey, C. [Chris Frey]. (2015, September 4). Student orientation [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rfd_8pTJBkY

Shadow Health. (n.d.). Shadow Health help desk. Retrieved from https://support.shadowhealth.com/hc/en-us 

Document: Shadow Health. (2014). Useful tips and tricks (Version 2) (PDF)

Document: Shadow Health Nursing Documentation Tutorial (Word document)

Optional Resource

LeBlond, R. F., Brown, D. D., & DeGowin, R. L. (2014). DeGowin’s diagnostic examination (10th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw- Hill Medical.
Chapter 2, “History Taking and the Medical Record” (pp. 15–33)

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Welcome and General Course Guidelines
Dr. Tara Harris reviews the overall guidelines and the expectations for the course. Consider how you will manage your time as you review your media and Learning Resources throughout the course to better prepare for your Discussions, Case Study Lab Assignments, Digital Clinical Experience (DCE) Assignments, and your Midterm and Final Exams (14m).
Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Module 1 Introduction
Dr. Tara Harris reviews the overall expectations for Module 1. Please pay special attention to the registration requirements for your use of Shadow Health for your Digital Clinical Experience (DCE) Assignments as well as the criteria for the DCE Assignments (3m).
Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload Transcript

Building a Comprehensive Health History – Week 1 (19m)

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3 sources for this discussion

Explain why you selected these individuals and/or teams and how they will support your success in the MSN program and as a practicing nurse

When was the last time you read Meditation XVII of John Donne’s Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions?

Unless you are a student of seventeeth-century poetry, you may not be all that familiar with this piece. However, you may be much more familiar with one of its well-known phrases: “No man is an island…”.

As you begin your journey toward achieving your academic and professional goals, you have a great opportunity to network with academics and professionals who can help ensure you do not travel alone. This network can help to clarify your own vision for success and can help guide you now and in the future. To paraphrase Donne, no one is an island.

Begin creating an academic and professional network by identifying which academic and professional connections and resources with which you need to collaborate to succeed in your MSN program and as a practicing nurse.

To Prepare:

  • Consider individuals, departments, teams, and/or resources within Walden University and within your profession that you believe can support your academic and professional success.
  • Identify at least two academic and at least two professional individuals, colleagues, or teams that might help you succeed in your MSN program and as a practicing nurse.
  • Download the Academic Success and Professional Development Plan Template.

The Assignment:

Academic and Professional Network

Complete Part 1 of your Academic Success and Professional Development Plan Template. Be sure to address the following:

  • Identify at least two academic and at least two professional individuals or teams to collaborate with to be successful in your MSN program and as a practicing nurse.
  • Explain why you selected these individuals and/or teams and how they will support your success in the MSN program and as a practicing nurse.